‘We have no business taking victory laps:’ Just as conditions were improving, second wave of COVID-19 strikes California nursing homes

By Annie Sciacca, Bay Area News Group, November 21 2020 SAN JOSE CA – NOVEMBER 18: On outbreak of COVID has been reported at Atria Willow Glen, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020, in San Jose, Calif., (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group) Large outbreaks at two San Jose care facilities are among the Bay Area’s surging COVID-19 cases Despite remaining sequestered inside their walls for more than eight months, almost totally isolated from family members and the outside world, residents of long-term care facilities across California now face another dangerous spread of the coronavirus in their midst.

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COVID-19’s Deadly Lesson: Time To Revamp Long-Term Care

By Deborah Gastfreund Schuss, Health Affairs Blog, November 17 2020 At age 42, James Reilly has lived in a nursing facility for seven years because of a worsening seizure disorder that struck when he was born. Betsy and Tom Reilly have been by their son’s side each day, gently exercising his limbs, monitoring his oxygen, and being James’ “extra set of eyes” since he cannot speak for himself.

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California nursing homes see surge in coronavirus cases amid statewide spike

By Catherine Ho, San Francisco Chronicle, November 12 2020 Nurses from John Muir Medical Center suited up in April before entering Orinda Care Center, where dozens of residents and staff members had tested positive for coronavirus.Photo: Noah Berger / Special to The Chronicle Coronavirus cases are starting to surge again in California nursing homes amid a third deadly wave of the virus.

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When COVID Hit: America’s Nursing Home Nightmare

By Al Jazeera English, November 4 2020 When the coronavirus pandemic hit the US, nursing homes became ground zero. By November, more than 60,000 nursing home residents had died of COVID-19, accounting for roughly a quarter of all fatalities nationwide. Yet the nursing home industry had already struggled with chronic problems before the pandemic. From allegations of systematic understaffing to toothless government oversight, Fault Lines examines what made residents and workers so vulnerable.

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As pandemic raged and thousands died, government regulators cleared most nursing homes of infection-control violations

By Debbie Cenziper, Joel Jacobs and Shawn Mulcahy, The Washington Post, October 29 2020 Heritage Hall in Leesburg, Va., with more than a dozen covid-19 deaths, was issued a $5,000 fine for not separating residents in a common area. (Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post) Despite promises of ‘aggressive enforcement,’ over 40,000 residents died in homes that received a clean bill of health At the outset of a looming pandemic, just weeks after the first known coronavirus outbreak on U.S.

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State to allow visitors inside nursing homes in most California counties

By Barbara Feder Ostrov, CALmatters, October 26 2020 After months of being unable to have in-person visits amid the pandemic, families across California will now be permitted indoor visits with loved ones in many nursing facilities after new guidance was released by the California Department of Public Health on Friday. Photo by Anne Wernikoff for CalMatters The pandemic had limited loved ones to window or patio visits – if at all – but new guidance lifts restrictions in those 46 counties with better virus control.

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Dying of loneliness: How COVID-19 is killing dementia patients

By Allison Griner, Al Jazeera, October 22 2020 [All illustrations by Jawahir Al-Naimi/Al Jazeera] Elderly people living in care homes are not just dying from coronavirus; they are dying because of the response to it. Teresa Palmer is sitting on the back porch of her home in San Francisco when the mobile phone in her hand starts to buzz.

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Why The ‘Kevin Bacon’ Factor Is Key To Understanding How COVID Spread In Nursing Homes

By Jackie Fortiér, LAist, October 21 2020 Adrina Rodriguez talks with a nurse through a window in April as she visits her father at the Gateway Care and Rehabilitation Center in Hayward where 19 residents have died of COVID-19. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) To make ends meet, Martha Tapia works 64 hours a week at two different Orange County nursing homes.

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COVID-19 patients moved to nursing home, 12 resident deaths reported

By Brooks Jarosz, KTVU FOX 2, October 15 2020 GILROY, Calif. – A dozen residents have died and at least 75 have become infected at a Gilroy nursing home, following the transfer of hospital patients sick with the coronavirus. A separate, isolated section of the Gilroy Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center opened its doors in August as a COVID-19 recovery unit.

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Deadly outbreak at a Santa Cruz County nursing home shows risk still runs high

By Mallory Moench and Lauren Hernández, San Francisco Chronicle, October 9 2020 An empty wheelchair can be seen in the alley between the Watsonville Nursing Home and the Post Acute Center on Oct. 8, 2020. Photo: Sara Gobets / Special to The Chronicle WATSONVILLE — Information was scarce and access to loved ones restricted Thursday as the worst possible scenario played out for family members of residents of the Watsonville Post-Acute Center — a coronavirus outbreak that has killed nine people and infected 61.

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